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Archive for the ‘Non fictitious’ Category

Girl stuff – Kaz Cooke

With over 600 pages and heaps of cartoons, Girl Stuff has everything girls need to know about: friends, body changes, shopping, clothes, make-up, pimples (arrghh), sizes, hair, earning money, guys, embarrassment, what to eat, moods, smoking, why diets suck, handling love and heartbreak, exercise, school stress, sex, beating bullies and mean girls, drugs, drinking, how to find new friends, cheering up, how to get on with your family, and confidence.

Each chapter includes facts, hints, inspiring lists, hundreds of quotes from real girls, and details for over 350 websites, books and other information. Written in extensive consultation with more than 70 medical, and practical experts, Girl Stuff provides the most up-to-date and useful information possible.

Kaz Cooke’s Website

Songs of a war boy – Deng Thiak Adut


Deng Adut’s family were farmers in South Sudan when a brutal civil war altered his life forever. At six years old, his mother was told she had to give him up to fight. At the age most Australian children are starting school , Deng was conscripted into the Sudan People’s Liberation Army. He began a harsh, relentless military training that saw this young boy trained to use an AK-47 and sent into battle. He lost the right to be a child. He lost the right to learn.

The things Deng saw over those years will stay with him forever. He suffered from cholera, malaria and numerous other debilitating illnesses but still he had to fight. A child soldier is expected to kill or be killed and Deng almost died a number of times. He survived being shot in the back. The desperation and loneliness was overwhelming. He thought he was all alone.

But Deng was rescued from war by his brother John. Hidden in the back of a truck, he was smuggled out of Sudan and into Kenya. Here he lived in refugee camps until he was befriended by an Australian couple. With their help and the support of the UN, Deng Adut came to Australia as a refugee.

Despite physical injuries and mental trauma he grabbed the chance to make a new life. He worked in a local service station and learnt English watching The Wiggles. He taught himself to read and started studying at TAFE.  In 2005 he enrolled in a Bachelor of Law at Western Sydney University. He became the first person in his family to graduate from university.

The good lie (movie)

Mao’s last dancer – Li Cunxin

Li Cunxin grew up in a remote commune village in China. His life was one of daily hardships – there was never enough food for him or his six brothers and his only entertainment, especially during the harsh winters, was being told Chinese fables by his father. His life seemed mapped out – he was “the frog at the bottom of the well” who would have to be content with being able to see only a small patch of sky. Then in 1971, at the age of 10, Li was chosen to train as a ballet dancer at Madam Mao’s Peking Dance Academy. His selection was based purely on his physique and the fact that he came from a family that had been peasants for three generations – he knew nothing about the art form at all. After seven gruelling years of training, with grim determination and the encouragement of his teachers, Li danced through his pain to become a talented performer who won a rare scholarship to America. It was this experience that lead Li, a fervent follower of Mao and Chinese Communist ideals, to discover the truth behind Chinese propaganda. In 1981 he famously defected, certain that in doing so he would never see his family or his homeland again. Through dance, a poor Chinese peasant child found a new life in America – the frog had escaped the well and could marvel at the expanse of sky.

Follow the rabbit proof fence – Doris Pilkington

Three girls, Molly, Gracie and Daisy, are “half-caste” Aboriginal youngsters living together with their family of the Mardu people at Jigalong, Western Australia.

One day a constable, a “Protector” in the sense of the Act, comes to take the three girls with him. They are placed in the Moore River Native Settlement north of Perth, some 1,600 kilometres away. Most children this was done to never saw their parents again. Thousands are still trying to find them.

This story is different. The three girls manage to escape from the torturing and authoritarian rule of the settlement’s head. Guided by the rabbit-proof fence, which, at that time ran from north to south through Western Australia,they walk the long distance back to their family.

Creativespirits
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Mao’s Last Dancer (movie)

The greatest showman (movie)

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