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The action kicks off in modern-day Paris with the murder of the Louvre’s chief curator, whose body is found laid out in symbolic repose at the foot of the Mona Lisa.

Seizing control of the case are Sophie Neveu, a lovely French police cryptologist, and Harvard symbol expert Robert Langdon, reprising his role from Brown’s last book.

The two find several puzzling codes at the murder scene, all of which form a treasure map to the fabled Holy Grail.

As their search moves from France to England, Neveu and Langdon are confounded by two mysterious groups-the legendary Priory of Sion,

a nearly 1,000-year-old secret society whose members have included Botticelli and Isaac Newton, and the conservative Catholic organization Opus Dei.

Both have their own reasons for wanting to ensure that the Grail isn’t found.

meanjin.com.au

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Comments on: "The Da Vinci code – Dan Brown" (7)

  1. I really enjoyed reading this book. It’s a story that is big and some times hard to understand but it just amazes you in every way. Again we are following the journey of the very intelligent symbologist, Robert Langdon. This time he is with a cryptologist Sophie Neveu investigating a very interesting murder at the Louvre Museum in Paris. At the murder scene they find some very puzzling codes that they need to work out. This is a really great book, no wonder it was one of the best-selling thrillers! This is a very gripping story that will not be able to put down. I really love this book because it’s such a captivating adventure and you really do learn heaps from it. I rate this book a 9/10.

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  2. This book is one of the best-selling thrillers for a reason. From even the prologue, the reader is captivated by Brown’s marvellous descriptions of artworks and architecture in the ‘Louvre’, France. Robert Langdon, the protagonist, is portrayed as a very wise man with lots of knowledge on the topic of symbology, especially the Divine Feminine. I was shocked to read about the true history of the Bible, and some of the messages and symbols Da Vinci was trying to emit in his famous works like The Mona Lisa, and The Last Supper. Brown has written an absolute page turner, each chapter unlike the previous. The Da Vinci Code enriches the reader with world history and knowledge makes one feel as much as a detective as Captain Fache, or even the roles that Langdon and Sophie take on in the novel. I would 100% recommend to anyone who is willing to be engaged and follow the thriller that is The Da Vinci Code.

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  3. I am in very mixed minds about this book. I really enjoyed how it was a nice quick read that gave me everything that I generally want in a book, likeable characters, a decent plot and a little action. But what I really didn’t like was how every single ‘clue’ in the book related completely to everything else, even though it is hard to understand how. If you can remember that this book is just fiction then you will possibly enjoy it for what it is. But if you find it hard while reading a book to decipher what exactly is accurate fact and what is simply made up, then you won’t enjoy it. I would rate it a 5/10. Though I can understand why others really found it worthy of a 10/10.

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  4. Steph said:

    This is possibly the most action filled novel I’ve ever read! It has surprises left right and centre and always veers off into a different path you didnt expect.
    This novel is about about a powerful secret that’s been kept hidden for thousands of years. The silence of the Louvre museum is broken when one of the gallery’s main curators is found dead on the grounds with weird symbols carved into his body and around the spot where he died. Hoping to find out the significance of the symbols, police bring in Sophie Neveu, a ‘cryptographer’ who is the victim’s granddaughter. Needing help, Sophie calls on Robert Langdon, a ‘symbologist’. As Sophie and Robert dig deeper into the case, they discover the victim’s involvement in the ‘Priory of Sion’, a secret society whose members have been told forbidden knowledge all the way back from the birth of Christianity. In their search, Sophie and Robert find evidence that might lead them to the final resting place of the ‘Holy Grail’, while members of the priory and an underground Catholic society known as ‘Opus Dei’ give chase, determined to stop them from sharing their greatest secrets with the world.
    This book is amazing, it keeps you sucked in until well after you’ve turned the last page.
    Must read for everyone! Although it’s a bit confusing! 🙂

    Did you know the movie was actually shot at the Louvre museum, Paris? 😉

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  5. this was a really good book for people who love a mystery and it intrigues you so you want to keep reading. The novel was very interesting and never got boring .

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  6. This book is just one example of when a book just can’t be translated to film. There is far more detail in this book and things are explained more clearly than in the movie. The controversy surrounded this book is I believe unjustified. It is just a story. There are many reasons why it could be true and also many why it could be false. People reading it should just try to read it with an open mind and respect that it is a fiction book not non fiction. I think that this book is very interesting and well worth a read as long as you’re not going to take it too seriously. It’s a good mystery thriller that keeps you turning pages.

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  7. If you love a mystery, with a bit of action, You’ll love “The Divinci Code” by Dan Brown.
    The book is about a professor called Robert Langdon who is called to louvre to Investigate and find clues to the Death of Jacques Suniere the Curator of the Louvre. Little did Robert know that in 24 hours time he would have solved one of the biggest cover ups of al time- The Holy Grail.
    This is a great book to read and very exciting, if you have seen the movie I recommend for you to read the book because it is way better.

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